Digit ratio (2D:4D) and social integration: an effect of prenatal sex hormones

Article


Kovářík, J., Branas-Garza, P., Davidson, M., Haim, D., Carcelli, S. and Fowler, J. 2017. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and social integration: an effect of prenatal sex hormones. Network Science. 5 (4), pp. 476-489. https://doi.org/10.1017/nws.2017.4
TypeArticle
TitleDigit ratio (2D:4D) and social integration: an effect of prenatal sex hormones
AuthorsKovářík, J., Branas-Garza, P., Davidson, M., Haim, D., Carcelli, S. and Fowler, J.
Abstract

The position people occupy in their social and professional networks is related to their social status and has strong effects on their access to social resources. While attainment of particular positions is driven by behavioral traits, many biological factors predispose individuals to certain behaviors and motivations. Prior work on exposure to fetal androgens (measured by second-to-fourth digit ratio, 2D:4D) shows that it correlates with behaviors and traits related to social status, which might make people more socially integrated. However, it also predicts certain anti-social behaviors and disorders associated with lower socialization. We explore whether 2D:4D correlates with network position later in life and find that individuals with low 2D:4D become more central in their social environment. Interestingly, low 2D:4D males are more likely to exhibit high betweenness centrality (they connect separated parts of the social structure) while low 2D:4D females are more likely to exhibit high in-degree centrality (more people name them as friends). These gender-specific differences are reinforced by transitivity (the likelihood that one’s friends are also friends with one another): neighbors of low 2D:4D men tend not to know each other; the contrary is observed for low 2D:4D women. Our results suggest that biological predispositions influence the organization of human societies and that exposure to prenatal androgens influences different status seeking behaviors in men and women.

LanguageEnglish
PublisherCambridge University Press
JournalNetwork Science
ISSN2050-1242
Publication dates
Online04 Jul 2017
Print01 Dec 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited30 Jan 2017
Accepted01 Nov 2016
Output statusPublished
Accepted author manuscript
Copyright Statement

This article has been published in a revised form in Network Science https://doi.org/10.1017/nws.2017.4 This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © Cambridge University Press 2017

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1017/nws.2017.4
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