Using a hot-spot procedure in an online study of perceptions of hand contamination

Book chapter


Sigger, J. 2022. Using a hot-spot procedure in an online study of perceptions of hand contamination. in: SAGE Research Methods Cases London SAGE Publications.
Chapter titleUsing a hot-spot procedure in an online study of perceptions of hand contamination
AuthorsSigger, J.
Abstract

A hot-spot question format has one or more configurable click-sensitive regions superimposed on an image where some kind of variable of interest is present. The researcher records how often the regions are clicked, therefore providing frequency data about choices or preferences. In this case study, a rationale is presented for using hot-spot questions and comparisons are made with alternatives such as numeric scales and rank-ordering approaches. The study describes how a hot spot question format was adapted and applied to investigate perceived hand contamination. For this investigation, four images of the palmar and dorsal sides of the left and right hands were overlaid with multiple hotspot regions so that the skin surface was divided into zones. In two separate studies, adult participants interacted, through a browser interface, with the skin surface hot spots to show what zones they perceived as contaminated after being in a public urban space and before washing their hands. The results supported a hypothesis that perceptual re-experience in the hands is highly associated with known densities of sensory neurons. In conclusion, hot-spot questions are engaging for participants and offer flexible, adaptable, and efficient ways of collecting frequency data online.

Book titleSAGE Research Methods Cases
PublisherSAGE Publications
Place of publicationLondon
SeriesSAGE Research Methods: Doing Research Online
ISBN
Electronic9781529604030
Publication dates
Print24 Mar 2022
Publication process dates
Deposited24 Mar 2022
Output statusPublished
Web address (URL)https://methods.sagepub.com/case/hot-spot-procedure-online-study-perceptions-hand-contamination
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.4135/9781529604030
LanguageEnglish
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