Identifying differences in the experience of (in)authenticity: a latent class analysis approach

Article


Lenton, A., Slabu, L., Bruder, M. and Sedikides, C. 2014. Identifying differences in the experience of (in)authenticity: a latent class analysis approach. Frontiers in Psychology. 5, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00770
TypeArticle
TitleIdentifying differences in the experience of (in)authenticity: a latent class analysis approach
AuthorsLenton, A., Slabu, L., Bruder, M. and Sedikides, C.
Abstract

Generally, psychologists consider state authenticity– that is, the subjective sense of being one’s true self – to be a unitary and unidimensional construct, such that (a) the phenomenological experience of authenticity is thought to be similar no matter its trigger, and (b) inauthenticity is thought to be simply the opposing pole (on the same underlying construct) of authenticity. Using latent class analysis, we put this conceptualization to a test. In order to avoid over-reliance on a Western conceptualization of authenticity, we used a cross-cultural sample (N = 543), comprising participants from Western, South-Asian, East-Asian, and South-East Asian cultures. Participants provided either a narrative in which the described when they felt most like being themselves or one in which they described when they felt least like being themselves. The analysis identified six distinct classes of experiences: two authenticity classes ('everyday' and 'extraordinary'), three inauthenticity classes ('self-conscious,' 'deflated,' and 'extraordinary'), and a class representing convergence between authenticity and inauthenticity. The classes were phenomenologically distinct, especially with respect to negative affect, private and public self-consciousness, and self-esteem. Furthermore, relatively more interdependent cultures were less likely to report experiences of extraordinary (in)authenticity than relatively more independent cultures. Understanding the many facets of (in)authenticity may enable researchers to connect different findings and explain why the attainment of authenticity can be difficult.

Keywordsauthenticity, inauthenticity, latent class analysis, self, culture
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
ISSN1664-1078
Publication dates
Online15 Jul 2014
Print15 Jul 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited29 Apr 2015
Accepted01 Jul 2014
Output statusPublished
Publisher's version
Copyright Statement

© 2014 Lenton, Slabu, Bruder and Sedikides. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00770
LanguageEnglish
Permalink -

https://repository.mdx.ac.uk/item/852zw

Download files


Publisher's version

Restricted files

Accepted author manuscript

  • 15
    total views
  • 3
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Sketching the contours of state authenticity
Sedikides, C., Lenton, A., Slabu, L. and Thomaes, S. 2019. Sketching the contours of state authenticity. Review of General Psychology. 23 (1), pp. 73-88. https://doi.org/10.1037/gpr0000156
State authenticity
Sedikides, C., Slabu, L., Lenton, A. and Thomaes, S. 2017. State authenticity. Current Directions in Psychological Science. 26 (6), pp. 521-525. https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721417713296
State authenticity in everyday life
Lenton, A., Slabu, L. and Sedikides, C. 2016. State authenticity in everyday life. European Journal of Personality. 30 (1), pp. 64-82. https://doi.org/10.1002/per.2033
Employability in the first degree: the role of work placements on students’ perceptions of graduate employability
Mahmood, L., Slabu, L., Randsley de Moura, G. and Hopthrow, T. 2014. Employability in the first degree: the role of work placements on students’ perceptions of graduate employability. Psychology Teaching Review. 20 (2), pp. 126-136.
Trait and state authenticity across cultures
Slabu, L., Lenton, A., Sedikides, C. and Bruder, M. 2014. Trait and state authenticity across cultures. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 45 (9), pp. 1347-1373. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022114543520
Value stability and change during self-chosen life transitions: self-selection versus socialization effects
Bardi, A., Buchanan, K., Goodwin, R., Slabu, L. and Robinson, M. 2014. Value stability and change during self-chosen life transitions: self-selection versus socialization effects. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 106 (1), pp. 131-147. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0034818
How does “being real” feel? The experience of state authenticity
Lenton, A., Bruder, M., Slabu, L. and Sedikides, C. 2013. How does “being real” feel? The experience of state authenticity. Journal of Personality. 81 (3), pp. 276-289. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6494.2012.00805.x
I feel good, therefore I am real: testing the causal influence of mood on state authenticity
Lenton, A., Slabu, L., Sedikides, C. and Power, K. 2013. I feel good, therefore I am real: testing the causal influence of mood on state authenticity. Cognition and Emotion. 27 (7), pp. 1202-1224. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2013.778818
How quickly can you detect it? Power facilitates attentional orienting
Slabu, L., Guinote, A. and Wilkinson, D. 2013. How quickly can you detect it? Power facilitates attentional orienting. Social Psychology. 44 (1), pp. 37-41. https://doi.org/10.1027/1864-9335/a000096
Power increases situated creativity
Gervais, S., Guinote, A., Allen, J. and Slabu, L. 2013. Power increases situated creativity. Social Influence. 8 (4), pp. 294-311. https://doi.org/10.1080/15534510.2012.742457
Getting what you want: power increases the accessibility of active goals
Slabu, L. and Guinote, A. 2010. Getting what you want: power increases the accessibility of active goals. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. 46 (2), pp. 344-349. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2009.10.013