Measures of exposure to the Well London Phase-1 intervention and their association with health well-being and social outcomes

Article


Phillips, G., Bottomley, C., Schmidt, E., Tobi, P., Lais, S., Yu, G., Lynch, R., Lock, K., Draper, A., Moore, D., Clow, A., Petticrew, M., Hayes, R. and Renton, A. 2014. Measures of exposure to the Well London Phase-1 intervention and their association with health well-being and social outcomes. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. 68 (7), pp. 597-605. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2013-202507
TypeArticle
TitleMeasures of exposure to the Well London Phase-1 intervention and their association with health well-being and social outcomes
AuthorsPhillips, G., Bottomley, C., Schmidt, E., Tobi, P., Lais, S., Yu, G., Lynch, R., Lock, K., Draper, A., Moore, D., Clow, A., Petticrew, M., Hayes, R. and Renton, A.
Abstract

In this paper, we describe the measures of intervention exposure used in the cluster randomised trial of the Well London programme, a public health intervention using community engagement and community-based projects to increase physical activity, healthy eating and mental health and well-being in 20 of the most deprived neighbourhoods in London.10 No earmarked resources to support the development of these measures and associated data collection were provided to either the research team or to those delivering the interventions on the ground. Instead, these were derived from contractually specified performance management information reported quarterly by partners and by inclusion of questions seeking information about participation in the follow-up questionnaires used to measure the main trial outcomes. The exposure measures are consequently considerably less sophisticated than those used in the US studies, where earmarked funding was available.

LanguageEnglish
PublisherBritish Medical Association
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
ISSN0141-7681
Publication dates
Online10 Feb 2014
Print03 Jun 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited16 Apr 2018
Accepted19 Dec 2013
Output statusPublished
Publisher's version
Copyright Statement

Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions
This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2013-202507
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https://repository.mdx.ac.uk/item/879ww

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