The role of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment services: a resource for commissioners, providers and clinicians

Report


Clancy, C., Flanagan, M., Greenslade, L., Gordon, E., Doherty, S., Evetts, C., Smith, M., Collins, D., The Royal College of Nursing (RCN), Association of Nurses in Substance Abuse (ANSA), National Substance Misuse Non-Medical Prescribing Forum and Public Health England (PHE) 2017. The role of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment services: a resource for commissioners, providers and clinicians. Public Health England.
TitleThe role of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment services: a resource for commissioners, providers and clinicians
AuthorsClancy, C., Flanagan, M., Greenslade, L., Gordon, E., Doherty, S., Evetts, C., Smith, M., Collins, D., The Royal College of Nursing (RCN), Association of Nurses in Substance Abuse (ANSA), National Substance Misuse Non-Medical Prescribing Forum and Public Health England (PHE)
ContributorsClancy, C., Flanagan, M., Greenslade, L., Gordon, E., Doherty, S., Evetts, C., Smith, M. and Collins, D.
Abstract

Commissioners and providers of alcohol and drugs services need to respond to an increasingly complex need in the populations they serve1. This requires services to be competent in identifying and responding to a wide range of health and social care needs and be able to support people to access treatment for co-existing physical and mental health issues, to enable recovery. This resource has been written by the Royal College of Nursing, the Association of Nurses in Substance Abuse (ANSA), the National Substance Misuse Non-Medical Prescribing Forum, and Public Health England. It describes the many possible roles of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment in England. It is one of a series of PHE-supported briefings on the roles of professions working in alcohol and drug treatment services, in the community and in secondary care2,3,4 and should be read in conjunction with them. This resource is to assist commissioners and providers of specialist adult alcohol and drug treatment services to identify the right workforce to meet the needs of their local populations. It does not address the wider role of nurses across other areas of health and social care, such as midwives, who make a significant contribution to the care of people who misuse alcohol and drugs, and their families. It outlines: •the roles of nurses working in alcohol and drug treatment including the contribution they can make to health and social care outcomes•the added value nurses can bring to alcohol and drug treatment•the competencies and skills that should be expected of nurses working in alcohol and drug treatment •what is required to develop and maintain these competencies potential added value of nurses is determined by the level of experience and training. Experienced nurses will be able to provide advanced clinical interventions and respond to more complex physical and mental health needs. It is important that the roles of nurses are not considered in isolation, but as a key part of a multidisciplinary team, responding to locally identified need.

LanguageEnglish
PublisherPublic Health England
Publication dates
Print01 Sep 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited02 Jul 2021
Output statusPublished
Publisher's version
Copyright Statement

© Crown copyright 2017
You may re-use this information (excluding logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3.0. To view this licence, visit OGL or email psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk. Where we have identified any third party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders concerned.
Ref: PHE publications gateway number 2017349

Additional information

This resource has been written by the Royal College of Nursing, the Association of Nurses in Substance Abuse (ANSA), the National Substance Misuse Non-Medical Prescribing Forum, and Public Health England
Working group members: Carmel Clancy, Mike Flanagan, Lynda Greenslade, Ellie Gordon,,Sue Doherty, Claudine Evetts, Martin Smith, Daniela A. Collins.

Web address (URL)https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/652963/Role_of_nurses_in_alcohol_and_drug_services.pdf
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