Business ethics in the curriculum: integrating ethics through work experience

Article


Hartog, M. and Frame, P. 2004. Business ethics in the curriculum: integrating ethics through work experience. Journal of Busines Ethics. 54 (4), pp. 399-409. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-004-1828-7
TypeArticle
TitleBusiness ethics in the curriculum: integrating ethics through work experience
AuthorsHartog, M. and Frame, P.
Abstract

In this paper we seek to make the case for a teaching and learning strategy that integrates business ethics in the curriculum, whilst not precluding a disciplines based approach to this subject. We do this in the context of specific work experience modules at undergraduate level which are offered by Middlesex University Business School, part of a modern university based in North West London. We firstly outline our educative values and then the modules that form the basis of our research. We then identify and elaborate what we believe are the five dimensions which distinguish an integrated approach based on work experience from a disciplines-based approach, namely: process and content, internal and external, facilitation and teaching, covert and overt, and living wisdom and established wisdom. The last dimension draws on the practical relevance of the Aristotelian notion of phronesis inherent in our approach. We go on to provide two case examples of our practice to illustrate our perspective and in support of our conclusions. These are that reflection integrated into the Business Studies curriculum, using the ASKE typology of learning [Frame, 2001, Proceedings of the 9th Annual Teaching and Learning Conference (Nottingham: Nottingham Business School, Nottingham Trent University), p. 80], in respect of personal and group process in a work experience context, provides a useful heuristic for the development of moral sensibility and ethical practice.

Research GroupProfessional Practice group for Leadership, Work and Organisations
PublisherKluwer
JournalJournal of Busines Ethics
ISSN0167-4544
Publication dates
Print2004
Publication process dates
Deposited27 Feb 2009
Output statusPublished
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-004-1828-7
LanguageEnglish
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https://repository.mdx.ac.uk/item/8135x

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