Independent effects of bottom-up temporal expectancy and top-down spatial attention. An audiovisual study using rhythmic cueing

Article


Jones, A. 2015. Independent effects of bottom-up temporal expectancy and top-down spatial attention. An audiovisual study using rhythmic cueing. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience. 8, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnint.2014.00096
TypeArticle
TitleIndependent effects of bottom-up temporal expectancy and top-down spatial attention. An audiovisual study using rhythmic cueing
AuthorsJones, A.
Abstract

Selective attention to a spatial location has shown enhanced perception and facilitate behavior for events at attended locations. However, selection relies not only on where but also when an event occurs. Recently, interest has turned to how intrinsic neural oscillations in the brain entrain to rhythms in our environment, and, stimuli appearing in or out of sync with a rhythm have shown to modulate perception and performance. Temporal expectations created by rhythms and spatial attention are two processes which have independently shown to affect stimulus processing but it remains largely unknown how, and if, they interact. In four separate tasks, this study investigated the effects of voluntary spatial attention and bottom-up temporal expectations created by rhythms in both unimodal and crossmodal conditions. In each task the participant used an informative cue, either color or pitch, to direct their covert spatial attention to the left or right, and respond as quickly as possible to a target. The lateralized target (visual or auditory) was then presented at the attended or unattended side. Importantly, although not task relevant, the cue was a rhythm of either flashes or beeps. The target was presented in or out of sync (early or late) with the rhythmic cue. Results showed participants were faster responding to spatially attended compared to unattended targets in all tasks. Moreover, there was an effect of rhythmic cueing upon response times in both unimodal and crossmodal conditions. Responses were faster to targets presented in sync with the rhythm compared to when they appeared too early in both crossmodal tasks. That is, rhythmic stimuli in one modality influenced the temporal expectancy in the other modality, suggesting temporal expectancies created by rhythms are crossmodal. Interestingly, there was no interaction between top-down spatial attention and rhythmic cueing in any task suggesting these two processes largely influenced behavior independently.

Keywordsentrainment; crossmodal; endogenous; exogenous; attention; expectancy; hazard function
LanguageEnglish
PublisherFrontiers Media
JournalFrontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
ISSN
Electronic1662-5145
Publication dates
Online06 Jan 2015
Print06 Jan 2015
Publication process dates
Deposited15 May 2015
Accepted05 Dec 2014
Output statusPublished
Publisher's version
License
Copyright Statement

Copyright © 2015 Jones. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution and reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3389/fnint.2014.00096
Web of Science identifierWOS:000363800700001
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