Dissociations in processing past tense morphology: neuropathology and behavioral studies

Article


Tyler, L., De Mornay Davies, P., Anokhina, R., Longworth, C., Randall, B. and Marslen-Wilson, W. 2002. Dissociations in processing past tense morphology: neuropathology and behavioral studies. The Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 14 (1), pp. 79-94. https://doi.org/10.1162/089892902317205348
TypeArticle
TitleDissociations in processing past tense morphology: neuropathology and behavioral studies
AuthorsTyler, L., De Mornay Davies, P., Anokhina, R., Longworth, C., Randall, B. and Marslen-Wilson, W.
Abstract

Neuropsychological research showing that the regular (“jump–jumped”) and irregular (“drive/drove”) past tense inflectional morphology can dissociate following brain damage has been important in testing claims about the cognitive and neural status of linguistic rules. These dissociations have been interpreted as evidence for two different computational systems—a rule-based system underlying the processing of regulars and the irregulars being individually listed in the mental lexicon. In contrast, connectionist accounts claim that these dissociations can be modeled within a single system. Combining behavioral data from patients with detailed information about their neuropathology can, in principle, provide strong constraints on accounts of the past tense. In this study, we tested five nonfluent aphasic patients, all of whom had extensive left hemisphere (LH) damage involving the left inferior frontal gyrus and underlying structures, and four patients with semantic deficits following herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) who had extensive damage to the inferior temporal cortex. These patients were tested in experiments probing past tense processing. In a large priming study, the nonfluent patients showed no priming for the regular past tense but significant priming for the irregulars (whereas controls show priming for both). In contrast, the HSE patients showed significantly impaired performance for the irregulars in an elicitation task. These patterns of behavioral data and neuropathology suggest that two separable but interdependent systems underlie processing of the regular and irregular past tense.

Research GroupLanguage, Learning and Cognition group
LanguageEnglish
PublisherMIT Press
JournalThe Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
ISSN0898-929X
Electronic1530-8898
Publication dates
PrintJan 2002
Publication process dates
Deposited02 Nov 2009
Output statusPublished
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1162/089892902317205348
Permalink -

https://repository.mdx.ac.uk/item/81x61

  • 35
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

The many facets of inhibitory control and their role in syntactic selection
Korko, M., Coulson, M., Jones, A. and De Mornay Davies, P. 2023. The many facets of inhibitory control and their role in syntactic selection. Language and Cognition. pp. 1-27. https://doi.org/10.1017/langcog.2023.44
Types of interference and their resolution in monolingual word production
Korko, M., Coulson, M., Jones, A. and De Mornay Davies, P. 2021. Types of interference and their resolution in monolingual word production. Acta Psychologica. 214, pp. 1-15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2021.103251
Automatic semantic priming: the contribution of lexical and semantic level processes
De Mornay Davies, P. 1998. Automatic semantic priming: the contribution of lexical and semantic level processes. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology. 10 (4), pp. 389-412. https://doi.org/10.1080/713752286
JBR: a reassessment of concept familiarity and a category-specific disorder for living things
Funnell, E. and De Mornay Davies, P. 1996. JBR: a reassessment of concept familiarity and a category-specific disorder for living things. Neurocase. 2 (6), pp. 461-474. https://doi.org/10.1080/13554799608402422
Greater priming for previously distracting information in young than older adults when suppression is ruled out
Ward, E., De Mornay Davies, P. and Politimou, N. 2015. Greater priming for previously distracting information in young than older adults when suppression is ruled out. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition. 22 (6), pp. 712-730. https://doi.org/10.1080/13825585.2015.1035224
Patterns of physical and psychological development in future teenage mothers
Nettle, D., Dickins, T., Coall, D. and De Mornay Davies, P. 2013. Patterns of physical and psychological development in future teenage mothers. Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health. 2013 (1), pp. 187-196. https://doi.org/10.1093/emph/eot016
Music of language, language of music
Franco, F., Brunswick, N. and De Mornay Davies, P. 2010. Music of language, language of music. The Psychologist. 23 (11), pp. 913-914.
The role of Broca’s area in regular past-tense morphology:an event-related potential study
Justus, T., Larsen, J., Yang, J., De Mornay Davies, P., Dronkers, N. and Swick, D. 2011. The role of Broca’s area in regular past-tense morphology:an event-related potential study. Neuropsychologia. 49, pp. 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2010.10.027
Reading and spelling in different orthographies: an introduction and overview
McDougall, S., Brunswick, N. and De Mornay Davies, P. 2010. Reading and spelling in different orthographies: an introduction and overview. in: Brunswick, N., McDougall, S. and De Mornay Davies, P. (ed.) Reading and Dyslexia in Different Orthographies. London Psychology Press.
Research seminars on music and language [part of Society section]
Franco, F., Brunswick, N. and De Mornay Davies, P. 2010. Research seminars on music and language [part of Society section]. The Psychologist. 23 (11), pp. 913-914.
Interpreting dissociations between regular and irregular past-tense morphology: evidence from event-related potentials
Justus, T., Larsen, J., De Mornay Davies, P. and Swick, D. 2008. Interpreting dissociations between regular and irregular past-tense morphology: evidence from event-related potentials. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience. 8 (2), pp. 178-194. https://doi.org/10.3758/CABN.8.2.178
Lost for words or loss of memories: autobiographical memory in a semantic dementia patient
Moss, H., Cappelletti, M., De Mornay Davies, P., Jaldow, E. and Kopelman, M. 2000. Lost for words or loss of memories: autobiographical memory in a semantic dementia patient. Brain and Language. 74 (3), pp. 350-354. https://doi.org/10.1006/brln.2000.2359
Event-related potentials demonstrate prolonged N400 priming effects for English irregular verbs
Justus, T., Larsen, J., De Mornay Davies, P. and Swick, D. 2005. Event-related potentials demonstrate prolonged N400 priming effects for English irregular verbs. Brain and Language. 95 (1), pp. 64-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2005.07.036
An event-related potential study of cross-modal morphological and phonological priming
Justus, T., Yang, J., Larsen, J., De Mornay Davies, P. and Swick, D. 2009. An event-related potential study of cross-modal morphological and phonological priming. Journal of Neurolinguistics. 22 (6), pp. 584-604. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneuroling.2009.07.001
Lost for words or loss of memories? Autobiographical memory in semantic dementia
Moss, H., Kopelman, M., Cappelletti, M., De Mornay Davies, P. and Jaldow, E. 2003. Lost for words or loss of memories? Autobiographical memory in semantic dementia. Cognitive Neuropsychology. 20 (8), pp. 703-732. https://doi.org/10.1080/02643290242000916
Ease of predication does not account for imageability effects in performance: a reply to [Jones, 2002]
De Mornay Davies, P. and Funnell, E. 2003. Ease of predication does not account for imageability effects in performance: a reply to [Jones, 2002]. Brain and Language. 87 (2), pp. 305-310. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0093-934X(03)00107-X
Semantic representation and ease of predication
De Mornay Davies, P. and Funnell, E. 2000. Semantic representation and ease of predication. Brain and Language. 73 (1), pp. 92-119. https://doi.org/10.1006/brln.2000.2299
Reading and dyslexia in different orthographies
Brunswick, N., McDougall, S. and De Mornay Davies, P. 2010. Reading and dyslexia in different orthographies. Psychology Press.