Fingermarks as a new proteomic specimen: state of the art and perspective of in situ proteomics

Book chapter


Francese, S. and Russo, C. 2019. Fingermarks as a new proteomic specimen: state of the art and perspective of in situ proteomics. in: Merkley, E. (ed.) Applications in Forensic Proteomics: Protein Identification and Profiling American Chemical Society.
Chapter titleFingermarks as a new proteomic specimen: state of the art and perspective of in situ proteomics
AuthorsFrancese, S. and Russo, C.
Abstract

For at least the first three decades since its advent, proteomics has exclusively largely belonged to a clinical, diagnostic, or fundamental biology context. However, the range and the significance of information that proteomes can disclose have led this discipline to be also applied to forensics, ranging from human identification from hair samples, identification of bodily fluids, and microbial forensics to doping investigations. Fingermarks are a relatively new specimen for proteomic studies with any form of proteomic investigation only appearing in 2012 with the analysis of intact peptides and small proteins in situ published by the research group at Sheffield Hallam University. It was not until 2015 that further developments allowed bottom-up proteomics to be also applied directly in situ. While in situ proteomics of fingermarks has many advantages, encompassing simplified sample preparation protocols, speed and the opportunity to perform molecular imaging analyses, this area remains under-investigated. This is probably due to the unique challenges of working with fingermark specimens. The relatively low protein content and the predominantly eccrine origin of fingermarks have been shown to severely impact protein detection at least when the “intact” protein approach is used both in full scan and using a top down approach. In this chapter, advantages, application, challenges and perspective of in situ fingermark proteomics are discussed and compared with classic approaches.

Sustainable Development Goals3 Good health and well-being
Middlesex University ThemeHealth & Wellbeing
LanguageEnglish
Book titleApplications in Forensic Proteomics: Protein Identification and Profiling
EditorsMerkley, E.
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
SeriesACS Symposium Series
ISBN
Hardcover9780841236493
Electronic9780841236431
ISSN0097-6156
1947-5918
Publication dates
Online08 Nov 2019
Print01 Jan 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited19 Jun 2023
Output statusPublished
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2019-1339.ch006
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