Label-free quantitative proteomics and substrate-based mass spectrometry imaging of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in ex vivo human skin and a human living skin equivalent model

Article


Couto, N., Newton, J., Russo, C., Karunakaran, E., Achour, B., Al-Majdoub, Z., Sidaway, J., Rostami-Hodjegan, A., Clench, M. and Barber, J. 2021. Label-free quantitative proteomics and substrate-based mass spectrometry imaging of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in ex vivo human skin and a human living skin equivalent model. Drug Metabolism and Disposition. 49 (1), pp. 39-52. https://doi.org/10.1124/dmd.120.000168
TypeArticle
TitleLabel-free quantitative proteomics and substrate-based mass spectrometry imaging of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in ex vivo human skin and a human living skin equivalent model
AuthorsCouto, N., Newton, J., Russo, C., Karunakaran, E., Achour, B., Al-Majdoub, Z., Sidaway, J., Rostami-Hodjegan, A., Clench, M. and Barber, J.
Abstract

We report for the first time label-free quantification of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XME), transporters, redox enzymes, proteases, and nucleases in six human skin explants and a three-dimensional living skin equivalent model from LabSkin. We aimed to evaluate the suitability of LabSkin as an alternative to animal testing for the development of topical formulations. More than 2000 proteins were identified and quantified from total cellular protein. Alcohol dehydrogenase 1C, the most abundant phase I XME in human skin, and glutathione S-transferase pi 1, the most abundant phase II XME in human skin, were present in similar abundance in LabSkin. Several esterases were quantified and esterase activity was confirmed in LabSkin using substrate-based mass spectrometry imaging. No cytochrome P450 (P450) activity was observed for the substrates tested, in agreement with the proteomics data, where the cognate P450s were absent in both human skin and LabSkin. Label-free protein quantification allowed insights into other related processes such as redox homeostasis and proteolysis. For example, the most abundant antioxidant enzymes were thioredoxin and peroxiredoxin-1. This systematic determination of functional equivalence between human skin and LabSkin is a key step toward the construction of a representative human in vitro skin model, which can be used as an alternative to current animal-based tests for chemical safety and for predicting dosage of topically administered drugs.
SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The use of label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to elucidate the abundance of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, transporters, redox enzymes, proteases, and nucleases in human skin enhance our understanding of the skin physiology and biotransformation of topical drugs and cosmetics. This will help to develop mathematical models to predict drug metabolism in human skin and to develop more robust in vitro engineered human skin tissue as alternatives to animal testing.

Sustainable Development Goals3 Good health and well-being
Middlesex University ThemeHealth & Wellbeing
LanguageEnglish
PublisherAmerican Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET)
JournalDrug Metabolism and Disposition
ISSN0090-9556
Electronic1521-009X
Publication dates
Online10 Dec 2020
Print01 Jan 2021
Publication process dates
Deposited19 Jun 2023
Submitted03 Jul 2020
Accepted08 Oct 2020
Output statusPublished
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1124/dmd.120.000168
PubMed ID33139459
Web of Science identifierWOS:000597933800006
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