Victim pressure, institutional inertia and climate change adaptation: the case of flood risk

Article


Harries, T. and Penning-Rowsell, E. 2011. Victim pressure, institutional inertia and climate change adaptation: the case of flood risk. Global Environmental Change. 21 (1), pp. 188-197.
TypeArticle
TitleVictim pressure, institutional inertia and climate change adaptation: the case of flood risk
AuthorsHarries, T. and Penning-Rowsell, E.
Abstract

Interviews were conducted with risk managers in a case-study area in England to determine the factors influencing the choice between more traditional, engineering based, adaptation to flood risk and those focussing on vulnerability reduction. The findings of in-depth analysis of these interviews have implications for climate change adaptation as a whole. They suggest that government policies to implement a broader range of adaptation measures might be hampered by institutional cultures formed
when structural, engineered approaches were the norm. Political decentralisation and the fashion for public consultation exacerbate this effect, leaving decision-makers more responsive to the influence of those directly affected by natural hazards than they are to the needs of the wider population or to policy pronouncements by government.

Keywordsadaptation; environmental risk; institutional inertia; flooding; engineering discourse; public consultation; victim pressure
Research GroupFlood Hazard Research Centre
PublisherElsevier
JournalGlobal Environmental Change
ISSN0959-3780
Publication dates
PrintFeb 2011
Publication process dates
Deposited27 Jul 2012
Output statusPublished
Web address (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2010.09.002
LanguageEnglish
Permalink -

https://repository.mdx.ac.uk/item/83qyw

  • 16
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as