Effects of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on the susceptibility of tomatoes to post-harvest proliferation of Salmonella enterica

Article


Marvasi, M., George, A., Giurcanu, M., Hochmuth, G., Noel, J., Gause, E. and Teplitski, M. 2014. Effects of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on the susceptibility of tomatoes to post-harvest proliferation of Salmonella enterica. Food Microbiology. 43, pp. 20-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fm.2014.03.017
TypeArticle
TitleEffects of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on the susceptibility of tomatoes to post-harvest proliferation of Salmonella enterica
AuthorsMarvasi, M., George, A., Giurcanu, M., Hochmuth, G., Noel, J., Gause, E. and Teplitski, M.
Abstract

Fresh fruits and vegetables are increasingly recognized as vehicles of salmonellosis. Pre- and post-harvest environmental conditions, and physiological, and genetic factors are thought to contribute to the ability of human pathogens to persist in the production environment, attach to, colonize and proliferate in and on raw produce. How field production conditions affect the post-harvest food safety outcomes is not entirely understood. This study tested how varying nitrogen and potassium fertilization levels affected the "susceptibility" of tomatoes to Salmonella infections following the harvest of fruits. Two tomato varieties grown over three seasons under high, medium, and low levels of nitrogen and potassium fertilization in two locations were inoculated with seven strains of Salmonella. Even though the main effects of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on the susceptibility of tomatoes to infections with Salmonella enterica were not statistically significant overall, differences in nitrogen concentrations in plant tissues correlated with the susceptibility of partially ripe tomatoes (cv. Solar Fire) to Salmonella. Tomato maturity and the season in which tomatoes were produced had the strongest effect on the ability of Salmonella to multiply in tomatoes. Tomato phenolics, accumulation of which is known to correlate with rates of the N fertilization, did not inhibit growth of Salmonella in vitro.

KeywordsCell Proliferation, Fertilizers/analysis, Food Contamination/analysis, Fruit/chemistry/growth & development/metabolism/microbiology, Lycopersicon esculentum/chemistry/growth & development/metabolism/microbiology, Nitrogen/metabolism, Potassium/metabolism, Salmonella enterica/growth & development, Time Factors, Field production conditions, Post-harvest infection, Produce safety, Salmonella enterica, Secondary metabolite
PublisherElsevier Ltd.
JournalFood Microbiology
ISSN1095-9998; 0740-0020
Publication dates
Print2014
Publication process dates
Deposited06 May 2015
Accepted21 Mar 2014
Output statusPublished
Publisher's version
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fm.2014.03.017
LanguageEnglish
Place of publicationEngland
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