Antifungals, arthropods and antifungal resistance prevention: lessons from ecological interactions

Article


Kett, S., Pathak, A., Turillazzi, S., Cavalieri, D. and Marvasi, M. 2021. Antifungals, arthropods and antifungal resistance prevention: lessons from ecological interactions. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 288 (1944), pp. 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.2716
TypeArticle
TitleAntifungals, arthropods and antifungal resistance prevention: lessons from ecological interactions
AuthorsKett, S., Pathak, A., Turillazzi, S., Cavalieri, D. and Marvasi, M.
Abstract

Arthropods can produce a wide range of antifungal compounds, including specialist proteins, cuticular products, venoms and haemolymphs. In spite of this, many arthropod taxa, particularly eusocial insects, make use of additional antifungal compounds derived from their mutualistic association with microbes. Because multiple taxa have evolved such mutualisms, it must be assumed that, under certain ecological circumstances, natural selection has favoured them over those relying upon endogenous antifungal compound production. Further, such associations have been shown to persist versus specific pathogenic fungal antagonists for more than 50 million years, suggesting that compounds employed have retained efficacy in spite of the pathogens' capacity to develop resistance. We provide a brief overview of antifungal compounds in the arthropods' armoury, proposing a conceptual model to suggest why their use remains so successful. Fundamental concepts embedded within such a model may suggest strategies by which to reduce the rise of antifungal resistance within the clinical milieu.

Keywordsantifungal resistance, antifungals, antimicrobial resistance, arthropods, fungi, insects
LanguageEnglish
PublisherThe Royal Society
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
ISSN0962-8452
Electronic1471-2954
Publication dates
Online03 Feb 2021
Print10 Feb 2021
Publication process dates
Deposited22 Feb 2021
Accepted11 Jan 2021
Output statusPublished
Accepted author manuscript
Accepted author manuscript
Accepted author manuscript
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.2716
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