Impact of dance in advertisements on emotional attachment towards the advertised brand: Self-congruence theory

Article


Manyiwa, S. 2020. Impact of dance in advertisements on emotional attachment towards the advertised brand: Self-congruence theory. Journal of Promotion Management. 26 (1), pp. 144-161. https://doi.org/10.1080/10496491.2019.1685620
TypeArticle
TitleImpact of dance in advertisements on emotional attachment towards the advertised brand: Self-congruence theory
AuthorsManyiwa, S.
Abstract

The present study examines how consumers’ perceived congruence between their self-concept and the image of the dance incorporated in online advertisements influences emotional attachment toward the advertised brand. The partial least squares structural equation model was applied to the data analysis. The results show that congruence between self-concept and the dance incorporated in online advertisements has a positive impact on emotional attachment toward the advertised brand. More specifically, the present study demonstrate that ideal self/dance-congruence increase emotional attachment towards advertised brand as hypothesized. However, contrary to expectations, actual self/dance-congruence has negligible contribution to emotional attachment towards advertised brand. The managerial implications of the study are outlined.

Keywordsactual self/dance-congruence, ideal self/dance-congruence, emotional brand attachment
PublisherTaylor and Francis
JournalJournal of Promotion Management
ISSN1049-6491
Electronic1540-7594
Publication dates
Online07 Nov 2019
Print02 Jan 2020
Publication process dates
Deposited25 Oct 2018
Accepted08 Oct 2018
Output statusPublished
Accepted author manuscript
Copyright Statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Promotion Management on 07/11/2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10496491.2019.1685620.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/10496491.2019.1685620
LanguageEnglish
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